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In the Tank

In the Tank

By Rosemary Frisino Toohey.

Product Code: I90000

  • One-act Play
  • Comedy | Farce | Satire
  • Cast size: 2m. or 2w., or 1m., 1w.

Rights and availability
This title can be licensed and sold throughout the World.

* Please note the royalty rate listed is the minimum royalty rate per performance. The actual royalty rate will be determined upon completion of a royalty application.

$8.95 /script

Min. Royalty Rate: $45/perf

In stock

Synopsis

What's it like to be peered at by hungry humans? Studied like a microbe under a glass? \tab chosen to be someone's dinner entree? Such is the predicament of Harry and Stu (or Liz and Angela), two lobsters who find themselves in the tank of a seafood restaurant. Harry is a crustacean who's been around the tank a few times. He's cleverly devised a "dead" act. Frozen in position, starey-eyed, claws rigidly akimbo, the "dead" pose is meant to ward off hungry diners and send them scurrying off to order the stuffed flounder or the filet of sole. Enter Stu, a lobster of a more philosophical bent. When Harry explains the rationale behind his act, Stu observes, "If you spend all your time acting like you're dead, what's the point of being alive?" Harry's not exactly a deep thinker, but he knows that if he doesn't try to fool the humans on the other side of the glass, he'll end up in the stewpot or the broiler; people are the ones who hold the dreaded tongs. But Stu reveals a little-known theory: humans are in a tank, too, and they face their own risks. They won't end up impaled on little forks, but they sometimes do stupid things that bring about their own destruction. Unlike animals empowered by instinct, humans must choose. For some, Stu says, it's a recipe for disaster. Why? Because they're afraid. The lobsters consider the idea that humans are really afraid of them. Maybe that's why people keep them bound up in rubber bands. So what's going to happen to the two priciest items on the menu? "None there be can rehearse the whole tale," says Stu, quoting a line from a Dead Sea Scroll. "One thing's certain," Harry says. "If the day ever comes when lobsters have dominion over people .... they're going to need an awful lot of rubber bands."

Details

  • Status

    In stock

  • Type of Show One-act Play
  • Product Code I90000
  • Cast Size 2
  • Min. Royalty Rate $45/perf
  • Cost $8.95
  • Approx. Run Time 25 min

Categories

  • Target Audience Young Audiences | Middle School | High School | College and Adult | Family (all ages) | Senior Adults
  • Performing Group Elementary School | Middle School | High School
  • Genre Comedy | Farce | Satire
  • ISBN(13) 9781583423790
* Please note the royalty rate listed is the minimum royalty rate per performance. The actual royalty rate will be determined upon completion of a royalty application.

Customer Reviews

"A hilarious comedy that had the audience laughing throughout the whole 25 minutes. The actors thoroughly enjoyed their roles. Fun time had by all!"
Review by Carmen Black, Northern Beacon Rebekak Lodge, Charlton, Ontario
"Are lobsters philosophers at heart? Are humans really at the top of the food chain? Depends who's telling the story. Angela and Liz get to the bottom of the age-old discussion on life and existence in this well-versed one-act play. Great for performance and viewing by all ages."
Review by Rosanne DellAversano, Arden Club Theatre, Arden, Del.
"Clever premise, clever analogyÑdoesn't need the length to make the point."
Review by Jenny, Loose Edge Reader's Theatre, Kodiak, Alaska
"It is a very cute show. It is ideal for high-school performers or community theatre groups."
Review by Sarah Graves, Halifax County Middle School, South Boston, Va.
"What a marvelous duet! Lots to laugh about and lots to think about. A wonderful vehicle for two actors, and the impact changes depending on your casting."
Review by Lorna Stratton, ICHTHYS Theatre Productions, Brantford, Ontario, Canada

Hints, Tips, and Tricks

"Keep the set simple. The script is powerful enough on its own!"
Tip by Carmen Black, Northern Beacon Rebekak Lodge, Charlton, Ontario
"You may want to at least wear red to give a "lobster-ish" hint so audience members aren't so focused on figuring out what the characters are during the first minutes of the show."
Tip by Sarah Graves, Halifax County Middle School, South Boston, Va.